Your Favorite Looney Tunes Short Not Featuring A Legacy Character.

Classic Speedy

John Belushi as Slimer
Staff member
Moderator
Reporter
Joined
May 13, 2003
Messages
41,196
I've got a few:

-Dog Gone Cats: Some of the finest rubbery animation from the Art Davis unit.

-Swallow the Leader: Not really a creative premise- it's just another cat vs. bird cartoon- but well-executed gags.

-There Auto Be a Law: One of the better "spot gag" cartoons. It helps that automobiles are a prime subject for parody. The ending is a classic, too.

-Wild Wife: aka "how many things can go wrong for one woman in a single day?"

-A Waggily Tale: Boy dreams he's a dog. A superior remake to 1955's A Waggily Tale, largely due to the little girl not being so unlikable. Plus it has Daws Butler doing many of the voices.

-High Note: A musical note gets drunk and causes havoc on the sheet music of The Blue Danube. A lot of great music in this one, and creative gags within the music atmosphere.

-The Mouse on 57th Street: Four words: "Oh boy! Da diamond!"

-Now Hear This: One of the most surreal Looney Tunes cartoons ever made.

-Chimp and Zee: Mainly for its funky late '60s soundtrack.
 

matbezlima

Active Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2021
Messages
102
Location
Brazil
I've got a few:

-Dog Gone Cats: Some of the finest rubbery animation from the Art Davis unit.

-Swallow the Leader: Not really a creative premise- it's just another cat vs. bird cartoon- but well-executed gags.

-There Auto Be a Law: One of the better "spot gag" cartoons. It helps that automobiles are a prime subject for parody. The ending is a classic, too.

-Wild Wife: aka "how many things can go wrong for one woman in a single day?"

-A Waggily Tale: Boy dreams he's a dog. A superior remake to 1955's A Waggily Tale, largely due to the little girl not being so unlikable. Plus it has Daws Butler doing many of the voices.

-High Note: A musical note gets drunk and causes havoc on the sheet music of The Blue Danube. A lot of great music in this one, and creative gags within the music atmosphere.

-The Mouse on 57th Street: Four words: "Oh boy! Da diamond!"

-Now Hear This: One of the most surreal Looney Tunes cartoons ever made.

-Chimp and Zee: Mainly for its funky late '60s soundtrack.
Chuck Jones won his first Academy Award with High Note, released in 1960.
 

chocolate

Mentally Still in 2016
Joined
Feb 24, 2018
Messages
315
Some of my favorites are

Nelly's Folly (1961)
High Note (1960)
Three Little Bops (1957)
I Love to Singa (1936)
Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs (1943)
Bouldevardier from The Bronx (1936)
Cinderella Meets Fella (1938)
 

KalloFox34

New Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2020
Messages
11
Location
Ohio
Some of my personal favorites include...
  • Rhapsody in Rivets (1941)
  • Dough Ray Me-Ow (1948)
  • The Bear's Tale (1940)
  • Beauty and the Beast (1934)
  • Rabbit Stew and Rabbits Too! (1969) (As bad as the post-1964 shorts were, this was a major exception)
  • The Cat Came Back (1936)
  • The Rattled Rooster (1948)
  • Fair and Wormer (1946)
  • Meatless Flyday (1944)
  • Early to Bet (1951)
 

Classic Speedy

John Belushi as Slimer
Staff member
Moderator
Reporter
Joined
May 13, 2003
Messages
41,196
Oh jeez, how could I forget Early to Bet? One of McKimson's best.

"Not Roll Out the Barrel!"
 

wiley207

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
1,535
Location
USA
Here are most (if not all) of my favorites not featuring any of the main/popular characters...

The Trial of Mr. Wolf (1941)
Coal Black and De Sebben Dwarfs (1943)
Pigs in a Polka (1943)
I Got Plenty of Mutton (1944)
Bacall to Arms (1946)
A Fox In a Fix (1951)
Sleepy-Time Possum (1951)
Punch Trunk (1953)
The Three Little Bops (1957)
Martian Through Georgia (1962)
Now Hear This (1963)
Bartholomew Versus the Wheel (1963)
Rabbit Stew and Rabbits Too! (1969)
 

disman00911

New Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2021
Messages
18
Location
Chicagoland
I Love to Singa (1936) - One of the first truly great Looney Tunes shorts. Classic about an young owl who wants to be a jazz singer instead of a opera singer.
A Day in the Zoo (1939) - A Tex Avery gag-a-thon about what goes on in the zoo.
Horton Hatches the Egg (1942) - Based on the Dr. Seuss book.
The Dover Boys... (1942) Often considered the turning point in Chuck Jones' career and one of his first truly great shorts.
Fair and Wormer (1946) - A wild and zany chase involving a worm, bird, cat, dog, dog catcher, his wife, a mouse and a skunk.
Chow Hound (1951) - The dog yelling "You Forgot the Gravy!" to the cat.
Early to Bet (1951) - The gambling bug, the cat and the dog.
Much Ado About Nutting (1953) - A squirrel trying to crack a nut but with no success.
Three Little Bops (1957) - A jazzy take on the 3 little pigs and the wolf trying to join the band.
Rocket-Bye Baby (1956) - A couple adopts an alien baby and mayhem ensues.
A Waggily Tale (1958) - A bratty boy who abuses his dog gets a taste of his own medicine when he dreams of becoming a dog and gets abused by his girl owner.
The Mouse on 57th Street (1961) - The gag "Oh boy, da diamond!" is the best part of this short.
Martian Through Georgia (1962) - An depressed alien wants to travel to Earth and unintentionally cause panic among the Earthlings.
Now Hear This (1963) - Very bizarre and surreal and the only one where that creepy Bill Lava version of the Looney Tunes theme/intro works as that theme is more associated with the dark ages period of Looney tunes (post-1964)

I almost put “Hamateur Night” (1939) on the list but that one has Egghead (Elmer Fudd's predecessor) and therefore doesn't count. I also wanted to put "Of Fox and Hounds" (1940) and "The Crackpot Quail" (1941) but those have the minor character Willoughby the Dog.
 
Last edited:

KalloFox34

New Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2020
Messages
11
Location
Ohio
I almost put “Hamateur Night” (1939) on the list but that one has Egghead (Elmer Fudd's predecessor) and therefore doesn't count. I also wanted to put "Of Fox and Hounds" (1940) and "The Crackpot Quail" (1941) but those have the minor character Willoughby the Dog.
Yeah... I ran into a similar situation regarding "Cinderella Meets Fella" (1938, with Egghead) and "Cheese Chasers" (1951, with Hubie and Bertie).
 

disman00911

New Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2021
Messages
18
Location
Chicagoland
A few other one-shots that I liked back then:

The Fighting 69 1/2th (1941) - Two groups of ants go to war over food at a picnic
The Trial of Mr. Wolf (1941) - Little Red Riding Hood is on trial and the big bad wolf is the attorney
Fox Pop (1942) - A red fox paints himself silver
Dough Ray Me-ow (1948) - A parrot tries to get a dimwitted cat killed so that he can inherit their owner's wealth
Sleepy Time Possum (1951) - A father opossum tries to wake up his sleeping son
The Turn-Tale Wolf (1952) - The Big Bad Wolf tells an alternate story where he's the hero and the Three Little Pigs are the villains
Punch Trunk (1953) - a tiny elephant unintentionally causes hysteria among people
Goo Goo Goliath (1954) - A couple adopts a Giant's baby by mistake due to the antics of the Drunken Stork (though this might not count because of the Stork)
Dog Tales (1958) - various stories about dogs
 
Last edited:

TsWade2

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2015
Messages
1,402
Cat Feud (1958) -Marc Anthony the dog and the cute and cuddly kitten Pussyfoot.
 

Spotlight

Staff online

Who's on Discord?

Latest profile posts

Then something bad is intensifying!
Asa
Peanuts creator Charles Schultz would've turned 99 years old today.
Lost of Christmas stuff on tonight Frosty and Frosty Returns is on CBS tonight, it's always on the night after Thanksgiving, so is Grandma Got Runover by a Reindeer on The CW, and NBC has the Original Grinch, ABC has Santa Claus is Comin' to town (though if you prefer to watch this one un edited Freeform is the better place to watch it )
Nick@nite finally got new Christmas brand just today started 6am!

Featured Posts

Top