Will Cartoon Network ever do more with animation?

SweetShop209

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Regarding CGI, I'd say it's because it's mainly used for preschool shows. For older skewing kids shows, it's primarily used in Star Wars cartoons and DreamWorks cartoons. The few CGI shows on Cartoon Network (besides Star Wars The Clone Wars and Ben 10: Destroy All Aliens) were primarily on the WB side (like Green Lantern The Animated Series and Beware The Batman). I mean, for Nickelodeon, outside of Nick Jr, how often do they use CGI? It's a bit more than Cartoon Network, but not by much.

As for stop motion, as others mentioned, even with a big team and a high budget, it still takes an extremely long time. It's why you don't see that many series use stop motion.
 
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cheril59

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The simple answer is that Stop Motion projects take forever to make, even by animation standards. It's arguably the most time-consuming form of animation since it requires constructing physical props and puppets, which itself is a very lengthy process. At least with 2D animation, you can bang out a character design in a couple hours. A stop motion puppet could take weeks to construct.

There's a reason stop-motion is not done very often in television. Even Robot Chicken, which has been running for over a decade, has year long gaps between seasons, sometimes more than that.
Stop Motion Pro is a good software to speed up the traditional stop motion process.
 

powerjake

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Regarding CGI, I'd say it's because it's mainly used for preschool shows. For older skewing kids shows, it's primarily used in Star Wars cartoons and DreamWorks cartoons. The few CGI shows on Cartoon Network (besides Star Wars The Clone Wars and Ben 10: Destroy All Aliens) were primarily on the WB side (like Green Lantern The Animated Series and Beware The Batman). I mean, for Nickelodeon, outside of Nick Jr, how often do they use CGI? It's a bit more than Cartoon Network, but not by much.

As for stop motion, as others mentioned, even with a big team and a high budget, it still takes an extremely long time. It's why you don't see that many series use stop motion.

Well Cartoon Network Studios is still missing out to bring in more viewers with entirely stop motion and CGI cartoons. Sad how they do not want to give those animation styles a chance.
 

powerjake

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Cartoon Network likes to save on the money when they make cartoons, but using a little extra money would not hurt just to make something thats not 2D animation.
 

SweetShop209

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Well, Disney Television Animation only uses CGI for their Disney Junior shows (then again, pretty much every Disney Junior show is CGI, whether it's from Disney Television Animation or not). As for stop motion, as others mentioned, it's very time consuming and expensive regardless of the team behind it. I think those Christmas stop motion shorts are probably the closest thing we'll get from Disney on a television budget.
 

AdrenalineRush1996

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Well, Disney Television Animation only uses CGI for their Disney Junior shows (then again, pretty much every Disney Junior show is CGI, whether it's from Disney Television Animation or not). As for stop motion, as others mentioned, it's very time consuming and expensive regardless of the team behind it. I think those Christmas stop motion shorts are probably the closest thing we'll get from Disney on a television budget.
I kinda wish Disney did CGI animated shows for Disney Channel and Disney XD.
 

SweetShop209

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It could also be because of training, and that many people are more suited to do 2D animation while 3D animation, and how there aren't as many people who have switched between 2D and 3D animation. For example, I found this tweet from Sabrina Cotungo, where she mentions how her recent show pitch asked if she can do it in CGI, and she gave this as part of her response. It's not a response for everyone, but it's a good point brought up.


There aren't as many storyboard artists who switch between 2D and 3D animation unless they've worked quite a bit in preschool programming or transition into it (some examples including Larry Leker, John Pomeroy, Hank Tucker, Jill Colbert, Ruolin Li, and Monica Tomova, just to name a few). Besides preschool programming, there's also CGI action shows like with Star Wars, which tend to have better animation due to large environments, and a number of the storyboard artists usually do work in 2D action shows. Of course, storyboards are already drawn in 2D before being made into 3D models. Take a look at one of John Pomeroy's animatics from Fancy Nancy.


In fact, Kyle Tsetso (a senior animator at Icon Studios, who have worked on CGI shows) talked about how it's mainly used in preschool programming.

 
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powerjake

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Why single out Cartoon Network? Disney TVA hasn't done much with CG either, and both they and Nickelodeon have done even less with stop-motion.

Atleast Nickelodeon has made some CGI shows like The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron, Boy Genius, Planet Sheen, and Back at the Barnyard, Fanboy and Chum Chum including Kamp Koral and Rugrats reboot.

Disney has had its own number of CGI cartoons.
 

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