The Defining Spider-Man Cartoon

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What is the defining Spider-Man show?


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Spideyzilla

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While listening to Christopher Daniel Barnes on a podcast recently, it occurred to me how split many fans are on this argument. He stated that he believed his show was the defining Spider-Man of all time, while I remember Greg Weisman and co saying that was their goal in making TSSM. So I decided to ask the question, what do you think is the defining Spider-Man cartoon? It was originally just going to be STAS vs TSSM, but I realize the other shows have fans as well, so I've added all Spider-Man cartoons as options.
 

Miyamoto Musashi

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Whatever my answer may be, it's not the 90s cartoon, nor is it Unlimited.
Ultimate is out of the question.
I'd like to say the first season of the 60s show, but that has a very weak Spider-Man, quick to fall unconscious after a hard punch from mere thugs. Ralph Bakshi sent Spider-Man far out of his element too often.
While I adore Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends, Spider-Man is not a team player.

So to me it's between the 1981 solo cartoon, MTV show, and The Spectacular Spider-Man.
 
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Frontier

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I think a big part of what goes into someone's "Defining Spider-Man Cartoon" is which one they grew up with.

You had a lot of kids in the 90's growing up with the 90's show with Christopher Daniel Barnes, quite a few older fans probably remember growing up with Amazing Friends or the other classic Spider-Man shows, Spectacular had its own generation of kids who got into Spidey through it, and Ultimate Spider-Man is the Spider-Man cartoon of the current generation.

I think Unlimited and The New Animated Series come at this with a bit of a disadvantage given how short their runs were and the specific issues that plagued each show give how "different" they were, for lack of a better word. Though they did have their legacies with Rino Romano (Spider-Man Unlimited) voicing Spidey in the Spider-Man games from the 2000's and Neil Patrick Harris (The New Animated Series) in Shattered Dimensions.

Personally, I was in the kind of sweet spot as a kid where my first major exposure to Spider-Man was the 90's show, which was a big part of my childhood, but I was also able to see a lot of other Spider-Man cartoons like the '67 cartoons and Amazing Friends through reruns, as well as watching Unlimited, The New Animated Series, Spectacular, and Ultimate when they all came out while I was growing up. So, suffice to say, I have a lot of experience with Spider-Man cartoons.

But what do I think is the defining Spider-Man cartoon? Well, it's hard for me to disassociate my own biases growing up with certain cartoons, so it's not easy for me to just pick out one as essential or definitive, but trying to look at the most major cartoons as objectively as possible:

The 90's cartoon was, for it's time and to a degree beyond, very defining in that it was the first major Spider-Man cartoon to not only really emphasize the double-life of Peter Parker and Spider-Man, but showcase his expansive and memorable supporting cast, love interests, Rogues Gallery, and the serialized storytelling and character development of the comics. It was also able to adapt some of the best and most iconic Spider-Man storylines and moments from the comics, and it's longevity hadn't been surpassed until Ultimate Spider-Man.

It also proved that you don't need a teenage Spider-Man to make a great Spider-Man cartoon.

Obviously the cartoons is dated in many ways, and the creators were hamstrung from the very beginning thanks to censors and budget issues, but for what it is it was the gateway for many people into the word of Spider-Man and tried to be as true to the comics as it could. It was aided in that regard by a strong voice cast and writing staff.

And, given the fact that the cartoon's adaption of the Symbiote eventually became the de-facto take for it in both the comics and other media, I'd say that's pretty darn definitive for a cartoon adaption.

The Spectacular Spider-Man was the definitive, modern, take on Spider-Man and his mythos, in my opinion.

It took from every era and avenue of the franchise and incorporated these elements quite well into the show and it's mythology, included as many characters as they could from the comics in a sensible way and updating them while still retaining their core essence and characters as well as their roles in the story. It was true and respectful to the history of the character of Peter Parker and Spider-Man, as well as his supporting cast, love interests, and Rogues Gallery, using them all effectively and at their most iconic. Nobody can beat the kind of serialized, developing, storytelling of Greg Weisman and co., and it worked phenomenally for Spectacular.

While the art style and character designs were very cartoony and stylized, it served the cartoon well and the animation was always very dynamic and fluid, which also lent to some impressive and memorable action sequences. All of which was also supplanted by some great writing.

I think Spectacular's biggest issue, without getting nitpicky, is that it's being cut short prevented it from being as definitive as the 90's cartoon. Especially when there were many characters, moments, and developments that they planned to use but were never able to get to, compared to how comprehensive the 90's cartoon was.

Ultimate Spider-Man...I think it's too unorthodox or unconventional a take on Spider-Man to ever be a truly defining Spider-Man cartoon.

For one we have less of an emphasis on Peter Parker and his life compared to Spider-Man, with Spidey's Superhero side and Superhero friends taking up 99% of the show's focus, which leaves his traditional supporting cast (or what little of them are actually in the show) with little to do when they're even given focus at all.

Most of Spidey's classic Rogues Gallery are also absent from the series for most of season 1, and only gradually phased in over the course of subsequent seasons. But said Rogues Gallery is also either dealing with very different takes on their character or a bare bones/shallow adaption of them, which is also the case for the traditional supporting cast to some degree.

The show does feature an expansive cast, but one made up mostly of other heroes who form up various teams that Spider-Man must lead. While this is a very interesting premise for Spider-Man, who is traditionally a solo star who teams up with other heroes every now and then, it also to some degree de-empahizes him as the main character of his own cartoon when he has to balance screentime with a bunch of other characters. Said characters who also generally (up until the Web Warriors) have no direct connection to the Spider-Man franchise and who often have only the barest minimum of character development and focus as the show moves from one character over to another.

USM has been able to introduce several characters and elements that have never been seen in a Spider-Man cartoon, including Miles Morales, Agent Venom, the Iron Spider suit, and the Kaine Scarlet Spider.

The show is also more prone to cartoony and wackier plots or humor then one would expect from a modern Spider-man cartoon, as well as more out-of-this world adventures then one would expect on such a consistent basis in a Spider-Man cartoon.
 

Muscle Wolf

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I'm old enough to remember the 60's Spidey and looking back, yeah, a lot of it was bad, simple and uncomplicated. But at the time, it was a refreshing change from the mundane antics of Superman, Batman and the Superfriends. I loved the background music and of course, the classic Theme song which still survives today. Ultimate Spiderman even payed tribute to the orignal in one Xmas episode that featured copying of the Spiderman webslinging animations and wallcrawling.
 
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In all honesty, the defining Spider-Man cartoons for me were 67 Spidey, Spider-Friends and 94 Spidey.

67 Spidey was incredibly faithful to the comics of the time, it had great music and although the animation was incredibly limited, it gave the show its charm. I also feel the voice performances were really fun and quirky, with excellent deliveries from all the actors around.

Spider-Friends was the first cartoon to have Spidey team-up with superheroes just as young as he was. While 67 Spidey showed the webhead at his wisecracking best, Spider-Friends made him a charismatic leader for the team, but one who still is only human. It helps that the chemistry between the leads is so fantastic. And once again, the acting is superb. The villains in particular were well cast and the actors portraying them really seem to have lots of fun in the roles.

94 Spidey was a novelty due to the fact that the storylines lasted for entire seasons and had strong continuity. It also had a different approach towards its villains by making some of them quite sympathetic or showing them being constantly wronged by others, so there is no choice for them but to get back to those who ruined their lives. It did have it's flaws and not all episodes were great (the Kraven debut was absolutely underwhelming), but it was a really action packed show.

Now, I have to say that even though a lot of people seem to love Spectacular Spider-Man, I'm not one of them, unfortunately. I really felt it was a meh and generic show. It just didn't bring anything new to the table and those designs were just horrid to look at and really wasn't big on a lot of the casting. Plus, the whole high-school drama tone just makes it even more annoying for me.

I mean, as flawed as 90's Spidey was, as limited as 60's Spidey was, as rudimentary as 70's live-action Spidey was and as light-hearted as Spider-Friends was, they all brought something new (60's Spidey was the first time we saw the character on TV; 70's Spidey was the first time the character was in live-action without being a mute guy who spoke with thought balloons and it also had some stunts that really made my heart pound, like seeing a real-life Spidey stuntman crawling over the Empire State Building; Spider-Friends had the novelty of a team of young superheroes who live together, go to the university together, have adventures and rib each other to no end; and 90's Spidey was innovative because of the season-long story arcs and managing to keep the tone close to the comics while also trying some neat plot ideas), whereas SSM mostly had me "Eh, I've seen this before, and it was handled much better then". Hell, even Spider-Man Unlimited was more creative than SSM.

Spider-Man Unlimited was a weird show from what I remember, but it did have some neat concepts and ideas. There were lots of flaws, but at least there was an honest attempt to try something new and the designs were better looking than those in SSM.
 

Freddy

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It kinda has to be Spectacular Spider-Man without even really breaking a sweat. In my opinion at least. It captures the spirit of the title character, has the most fluid animation, voice cast where the majority of the actors are arguably the definitive voices of their respective characters and darn good writing by the standards of any show, not just a superhero cartoons for kids. Not to mention, the show did some really nifty artistic choices (not trying to sound pretentious, it just was the most fitting word that came to my head) like using a performance of a Shakespeare play as the framing device or scoring an entire episode with classic opera music, which are something that you rarely see in action cartoons or just cartoons in general. If this show had kept going longer, I think it could have reached the same status that Batman the Animated Series enjoys with the general audience, rather than just being the fan-favorite.

60's show has its memetic charm and was probably the best they could have done with the standards and practices of the time, not to mention the diminishing budget of each season, but you have to be either real hardcore completionist Spidey - fan or animation junkie to get through it. I mean, I catch up to cartoon shows by going through them one episode per morning while eating breakfast, before getting to work, so I'm hardly in a state of mind to consume high art, but seasons 2 and 3 started to feel like chores with their obviously bad production values.

The 80's show was trying to do something special for its time with the 8 episodes long Dr. Doom story-arc (and reportedly, if the show had been renewed, the entire second season would have had an ongoing story) and understanding what made Spider-Man originally stand out from the other superheroes of the time of his creation. It's just that the writing overall was pretty generic 80's action show shlock and Ted Schwartz's performance as Peter Parker/Spider-Man was rather weak.

The Amazing Friends was just a silly show for the kids, with no ambitions to be anything more, but it was just so cheerful and harmless that I can't really muster any negative feelings for it. It is junk food, but the kind of junk food that you don't feel too bad about consuming. Plus, the episodes animated by Toei have aged pretty well in comparison to the other shows of the time.

As for the 90's show... if you go through my posts over the years, you can probably tell that my feelings have gone all over the place in regards to this show. At one point I took every chance I got to trash it (not pround of that, btw.,that was childish of me) and call it overrated. After bidge-watching through it couple of years ago, I have grown a soft spot for it. It was ambitious for its time and it had some standout episodes that I would feel comfortable calling genuinely great (general rule of thumb: unless a wedding is involved, the episodes featuring the Goblins are the best ones), but the show overall is just plagued too much by its flaws for me to say that it fully deserves the pedestal it has been placed by its fanbase. The constant reuse of stock footage gets really distracting, the voice acting is often either hilariously hammy or stilted, the continuity is all over the place and every single important relationship development happens off-screen between the episodes (for example, Liz Allen confesses her love for Harry in a season 5 episode... after never interacting with him in any of the previous seasons/episodes and having like one speaking appearence beforehand in season 2).

Spider-Man: Unlimited is not a good show. It's not even a flawed show with great singular episodes, redeeming moments or campy charm, it's just bad. Probably not as bad as its reputation would lead you to believe and definetly not bad enough to make me mad (that show comes later), but bad nonetheless. Even if you can get over the very unorthodox setting for Spider-Man, the show tries too hard to have its cake and eat it too. You can't both drop Spidey on an alien planet ruled by an evil dictator and also have him try to live normal life with usual Peter Parker problems. The two premises just don't work together. And the show just screams to be more serialized, but most of the episodes are more or less standalone adventures with very little story progession, with all the major plot-points stuffed in the season finale, which ended on an unresolved cliffhanger! Maybe season 2 could have been an improvement, but we are judging the shows we got, not some fantasy versions of them, and Unlimited was kinda a mess.

The MTV show, in my opinion, is kinda underrated. It was aiming to be more mature show for teenage/young adult audience, but it thankfully didn't go the wrong way about it with pointless cursing, violence or the like, but rather tried to simpy have more serious tone than previous Spider-Man show. It also didn't pander to its audience by trying to make Peter cooler or anything, and Neil Patrick Harris was excellent casting choice (my third favorite Spider-Man after Josh Keaton and Yuri Lowenthal, in fact). Unfortunately, the show kinda suffers from the typical shortcomings of first seasons, I.E. it kinda spents the entire season looking for its identity, some of the dumb network demands limited the show ("no old people" mandate meant no Aunt May or direct references to Uncle Ben) and trying to connect to the continuity of the first Sam Raimi movie meant that they had mostly use new made-up baddies (who, let's be honest, were mostly kinda lame) rather the classic ones from the comics. And like Unlimited, it ends on unresolved cliffhanger, although unlike Unlimited, while it would be nice if the show had continued and gotten resolution, it kinda works as a sad downer ending.

Then we have Ultimate Spider-Man... I know this show has its fans, so I will not trash it on its own merits (although, believe me, I think it is all around horrendous show), but let's just stick to saying that it can't be the definitive Spider-Man show, because it took so many liberties. The title charcters rarely acts like Peter Parker from the comics and while you can point out some surface - level similarities to the comic series of the same name, the overall premise is nothing like Spider-Man of any of the comics.

As for the current show, I can't really speak for its fairly, since I have never watched a full episode of it, but based on everything I have seen so far, it isn't bad, but it does nothing to stand out and the horribly cheap looking animation does it no favors. Plus, while USM was worse show, it at least generated discussion and people formed strong opinions about it. I never hear anyone bring up this show, which can't mean it will have a strong legacy once it's done.
 
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Webbed-Wonder

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It's a tough question to answer because they all are Spider-Man to varying degrees. I think the 90s cartoon gives the most complete version of Spider-Man as it takes 30+ years of comic history and tried to tell a lot of important beats from that with its own adapting, and some of those ideas became pretty influential on viewers and their subsequent recollections of certain stories (Venom). Today it's sometimes a very stumbly and cheesy time, but also very charming because of how ambitious it was in trying to replicate the experience of Spidey's ongoing adventures and maturing. At the end you've got a great complete arc for him which is cool, and it offers a peek at something later takes would be keen to explore more of (the multiverse!) so it was forward thinking in that regard as well.

Spectacular Spider-Man is probably the best produced show there's been. It's the best written, most intricately plotted and planned, most fluidly animated with lots of tasteful decisions that reminds me of the approach to finding a perfect stylized look for the character's world that Batman TAS was able to for Batman. I get the sense from the backgrounds to the way characters look that they were trying to get to the essence of those characters elegantly. It's probably the closest to the feeling of the original comics we've ever seen in an adaptation (although I'd say the first two Sam Raimi movies also get close to capturing the essence of the 60s comics as well). It's a very good take on Spidey, just unfortunately as others have noted before it's still not complete and never really got to see all that potential through. I think if it got to have a full run and wasn't a victim of so many circumstances it would be unquestionably viewed as the definitive take.

I think those are the two big ones. Ultimate, despite having the longest run, is not very much focused on the things Spider-Man usually is. That's probably why it had such a long run, because it was full of superheroes, teams of superheroes, team ups, comedy, vehicles, gadgets, and lots of action. I don't personally know what the fans of the show see in it but if I had to guess why it was such a hit with the target demographic was that it was Spider-Man mixed with all of the above. The final season is probably the strongest, and also the one that tries the most to be focused on Spider-centric characters- go figure! So yeah, I don't see how a show like this can be considered a definitive take. Hardly even any romance because boys don't want to see girls kissing Spider-Man! Only in the final episodes is that finally broached and Peter and MJ are finally allowed to start showing feelings after it being dismissed in the first episode.

The 2017 cartoon is better written than Ultimate and enjoyable for what it is. It gets what Spidey is about at the end of the day, but again falls into the trap Ultimate had its whole run of most of the people in his life slowly becoming superpowered people when that's just not something that should be the norm for Peter Parker. The people in his life mostly being normal people helps ground him. I think it mainly pulling from stories from the last 10 years doesn't help make it the definitive take, and it also unfortunately feels kind of cheap after coming off of the higher production values of Ultimate. (I do think Ultimate looked good, if a bit too generic action cartoon-ish) This at least has something stylistic it's trying to go for, I just find it kind of bland and flat for lack of better terms (the literal no shading doesn't help).

The 2003 MTV cartoon is underrated, it does indeed fall into the vat of shows consumed by the first season identity crisis and it's a shame because by the end it finally felt like it found its footing and was aiming to just tell more mature stories with real consequences. There were glimpses of that throughout the show's run also, though, and when that happened the show really shined bright. Most of the original villains were nothing special to write home about and were serviceable, but some of the takes on comic book mainstays were very in line with the show's darker tone. From the cold-blooded killer version of the Lizard, to the bullying victim turned killer, turned ghost-stalker Electro- it fit. It got the struggle of being Spider-Man quite well, the impact it leaves on Peter's life, being mistrusted by the public- but also the way Spidey looked and moved was truly impressive. I don't think it got much of a chance to do anything big but I look back on it fondly.

Unlimited is the furthest thing from typical Spidey so I can't consider it definitive Spidey. It's not bad, it's enjoyable to be sure! It's fun seeing Spidey placed in such a dingy sci-fi setting, and the costume they came up with was great, I just wish they got to actually do more with the setups because just as they finally start to really get places with it the show abruptly ends. It would have been nice for it to properly finish its story at the very least, I see no harm in it.

I like how the 1981 Spidey show and Amazing Friends both bear strong resemblance to John Romita Sr.'s artwork which is one of the definitive Spidey takes visually in the comics. It's fun seeing shows that look like classic Spidey. As others have noted, the Dr. Doom story arc is the big highlight of the 81 solo Spidey show- but there are some fun episodes besides that for sure. This and Amazing Friends are just fun times for the most part and don't often go beyond being that, so I can't call them definitive at the end of the day. The solo 81 show does tackle more of the Spidey dual-life drama but it often gets resolved easily, still I admire them trying because that is a core staple. The origin episodes in Amazing Friends are some of the best of that show with great animation and a little more dramatic heft.

The 60s cartoon is zany. The first season has its fair share of stroies inspired pretty directly from the original comics but at the same time takes many of the Peter drama out of them and simplifies them. The best episode to me is the first Mysterio episode as it's full-length, and a pretty spot on adaptation of that comic. I also really like the second Mysterio episode because it's bonkers and a great example of the show's weirdness acting in top form as it's like a Scooby Doo type plot but with Spidey. The Ralph Bakshi seasons have its moments early on but then becomes a blur of insanity. I don't know if I'd call this show definitive but it's certainly got classic Spidey elements worth checking out.

Closing thoughts is it's a hard question to answer. Maybe we still haven't gotten the true definitive show that does it all and has killer production values, we've gotten shows that maybe get one or the other, or both but don't get much time to showcase that. Even though I believe Spectacular is the best produced show we've gotten I might have to lean towards the 90s show because it feels the most complete and true to Spidey despite its flaws. If Spectacular got more seasons it would unquestionably be the one that did it all.

I grew up mostly with 90s reruns, VHS tapes of both 80s shows, a couple episodes of the 60s show, MTV show was the first I watched as it was airing, watched all of Spectacular as it was airing and those are the ones I caught as my teen years started coming in.
 
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Spider-Man

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While it's not the best cartoon of the bunch, far from it, the argument can be made that the 1990s is the defining animated series for Spider-Man. It perfectly captured the ridiculous of the comics at the time. All the overwrought drama and ridiculous stories and dialogue and the addictive serial nature. While Spectacular Spider-Man is easily the best and most accurate Spider-Man cartoon to date in really capturing the essence of the character the 90s one will always be thought of as THE Spider-Man cartoon.
 
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Fone Bone

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While it's not the best cartoon of the bunch, far from it, the argument can be made that the 1990s is the defining animated series for Spider-Man. It perfectly captured the ridiculous of the comics at the time. All the overwrought drama and ridiculous stories and dialogue and the addictive serial nature. While Spectacular Spider-Man is easily the best and most accurate Spider-Man cartoon to date in really capturing the essence of the character the 90s one will always be thought of as THE Spider-Man cartoon.
I can't really disagree with that. However I still don't believe there has been a great defining cartoon for Spider-Man yet, since I think Spectacular was overrated, and actually crappy. Batman, Superman, the Justice League, even the X-Men have each gotten defining and / or high quality series attached to them. I don't think Spider-Man has yet.

Edit:

You know what? I'm starting to think we really shouldn't dismiss Into The Spider-Verse. Yeah, it's a movie, but it's also the best Spider-Man cartoon. Shouldn't that count for something?
 
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I can't really disagree with that. However I still don't believe there has been a great defining cartoon for Spider-Man yet, since I think Spectacular was overrated, and actually crappy.

You know what? I'm starting to think we really shouldn't dismiss Into The Spider-Verse. Yeah, it's a movie, but it's also the best Spider-Man cartoon. Shouldn't that count for something?
Oh, god yes. I agree with you about SSM. I just find it incredibly overrated (then again, there's a lot of popular stuff that I find overrated).

And yeah, Spider-Verse should be accounted in this. I think that, as a different type of story, it does a good job at being fun and entertaining while also adding all those elements that make the characters what they are. So yeah, I think it should be taken into consideration despite the different kind of storyline.
 
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Fone Bone

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Oh, god yes. I agree with you about SSM. I just find it incredibly overrated (then again, there's a lot of popular stuff that I find overrated).
The writing on that show was absolutely atrocious, and it shocks me that people think that was its biggest selling point. It was a Greg Weisman career low point.
And yeah, Spider-Verse should be accounted in this. I think that, as a different type of story, it does a good job at being fun and entertaining while also adding all those elements that make the characters what they are. So yeah, I think it should be taken into consideration despite the different kind of storyline.
It was amazing so it should count. It's weird I didn't even think of it when I made my first response.
 
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Awest66

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The definitive Spider-Man cartoon remains the Spectacular Spider-Man in my opinion. There was just so much care put into the writing and characterization and while people often criticize the character designs, Their simplicity made for some thrilling action sequences. It may not have lasted long but it definitely left it's mark. When comments on this thread say, It didn't bring anything new to the table, I think they're really missing the point. The show didn't need to introduce a new gimmick or do anything outlandish because the way it chose to execute the basic story of Spider-Man was just done so well

I have a lot of nostalgia for the 94 cartoon and I think it overall is still a great rendition of Spider-Man and his world but these days, It's very easy to see the cracks in it. The animation is hit and miss, the voice acting can get unintentionally hilarious and it clearly buckled under the heavy censorship and the same kinds of storylines that were driving Marvel into bankruptcy. That being said, It had a great version of Spidey himself, some very well done villains and probably the best version of the Alien Costume storyline to date. It's not perfect but it's still a lot of fun.

The 67, 81 and the Amazing Friends shows are all good for what they are, The 2003 show was solid and the current Spidey show leaves no impression on me at all.

Ultimate Spider-Man is very easily the worst. Just from the very first episode, It's made clear the show doesn't understand the character at all (Having the premise of the show be him learning about responsibility which doesn't make any sense considering that was the entire point of his origin which the show kept in) and that's not even counting the painfully unfunny cutaway jokes, thinly written characters and the inconsistent tone. It's about as far from the "definitive Spider-Man cartoon" as you can possibly get.

The writing on that show was absolutely atrocious, and it shocks me that people think that was its biggest selling point. It was a Greg Weisman career low point.
You can't be serious, The Spectacular Spider-Man's writing was vastly superior to any Spidey show before or since. How in heavens name was it Greg Weisman's "low point"?

Mod Note: Double Post merged. Please use the Edit button instead of posting multiple times in a row.
 
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Fone Bone

Matt Zimmer
You can't be serious, The Spectacular Spider-Man's writing was vastly superior to any Spidey show before or since. How in heavens name was it Greg Weisman's "low point"?
Four words: "I'd better be going."

Peter and Gwen refused to talk out their problems, and were always distracted from doing that by unrealistic "inopportune phone calls" and the like. It was cliched hackneyed writing and absolute garbage. And the defense I always hear is that because they are teenagers, it's realistic. Oh, goodie, now obnoxious emo teenagers have a superhero they can relate to. Neat.
 
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Frontier

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Peter and Gwen refused to talk out their problems, and were always distracted from doing that by unrealistic "inopportune phone calls" and the like. It was cliched hackneyed writing and absolute garbage. And the defense I always hear is that because they are teenagers, it's realistic. Oh, goodie, now obnoxious emo teenagers have a superhero they can relate to. Neat.
Well, I definitely don't think they were "emo" when it came to their emotional problems, just indecisive and prone to fleeting fights of fancy (which I think is believable for teenagers).

But I know characters not talking out their issues when they clearly should is a big sticking point for you.
 

Fone Bone

Matt Zimmer
Well, I definitely don't think they were "emo" when it came to their emotional problems, just indecisive and prone to fleeting fights of fancy (which I think is believable for teenagers).
I don't care. It was crap writing and an excuse for Weisman to string the audience along and only tell the part of the story that matters in season finales. It is his worst show by a longshot.
 
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Frontier

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I don't care. It was crap writing and an excuse for Weisman to string the audience along and only tell the part of the story that matters in season finales. It is his worst show by a longshot.
It's hard to argue for that in my opinion when the quality of so much else on the show is high-grade.

I also disagree with the bolded in the sense that what happens in the finale's is only relevant thanks to all the build up across the season.
 

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