"Star Trek: Discovery" Season 3 Talkback (Spoilers)

Yojimbo

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Star Trek: Discovery Season 3

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Now living in a time filled with uncertainty, the U.S.S. Discovery crew, along with the help of some new friends, must work together and restore hope to the Federation.

Episode 30 (3x1) "That Hope Is You"
Burnham navigates a strange, new galaxy, 930 years in her future, looking for the rest of the Discovery crew.

Related Threads
-CBS All Access Official Site
-News & Discussion Thread
-Season 1 Talkback
-Season 2 Talkback
-Shorts Treks Talkback
 

Fone Bone

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Star Trek: Discovery "That Hope Is You, Part 1"

I am all in for this season. I never expected another Star Trek season to get me as excited as the first season of Picard did so soon after that. But this is going to be awesome.

I will make this review briefer than I want it to be because I imagine I will be talking about this all day otherwise. And nobody wants that. I'll get to the episode's major themes and try and call it a day.

One of the biggest challenges of a season set a thousand years in the future is that the writers of this episode, (and the first episodes of this season), will be given an amazingly hard task: To come up with science fiction technology that seems as magical to Burnham, as the original Star Trek tech did to us back in the 1960's and 1980's. And I think they did a PRETTY good job of that. And it probably cost a fortune to do in visual effects. I expect this to be the most expensive Star Trek season of all time for that reason. The future is wonderful and horrible beyond all recognition.

I love that the Starfleet guy in the suit basically got up and went to work every day for 40 years waiting for Michael Burnham, or somebody just like her, to show up. I like that very much. And the bird clock is awesome. I want one of those. Now.

One of the aliens chasing Book and Burnham is clearly a Lurien, which is the species Morn from Deep Space Nine was. If they really wanted to geek me out they would have given him lines.

I don't like the new design of the Andorians, although it's not as egregiously bad as the Klingons were in the first two seasons. Speaking of which, if and when the Klingons show up I hope they look normal again now that Paramount is back with CBS, and there are no longer licensing issues with the designs. Those monster designs and wrong costumes were the things I hated most about Discovery's first two seasons. The Andorians being different concerns me a little bit, but the Next Gen era of producers souped up the Borg in First Contact and Voyager too, so that's not a completely unprecedented turn of events. We get some "right-looking" Klingons this year, and I'll forgive it entirely.

I'm gonna sign off this review early, because I will yak your ear off all day otherwise. Suffice it to say I loved it. *****.
 

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Episode 31. (3x2) Far From Home
The crew of the Discovery races to repair their ship after a they crash. Tilly and Saru make a first contact looking for Burnham.
 

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Star Trek: Discovery "Far From Home"

I love Burnham's new hair. Awesome.

Jett Reno continues to be the best character on the show. Her stuff with Stamets was priceless.

And yay, Paul and Hugh are back together! Who says the future isn't bright?

That Zaru guy is literally the worst future human being we have ever seen in Star Trek. We have met some sociopaths set during our past, but this is the first absolute psycho we've seen for an "evolved" future human. And it's like Picard and friends essentially evolved into guys like him. I personally think Gene Roddenberry would be having conniptions. I personally don't object because sociopaths aren't something you can evolve away from or breed out of a species. I like that we've never seen a future human this bad before. But it's unrealistic we hadn't.

Once Georgiou shows up in the bar I was like "These guys are toast". What's amazing is that while her advising the flunkie to shoot Zaru doesn't get anywhere, everyone's shocked she not only said the idea out loud, but that it sounds rational. It's at this point Zaru needs to shoot her so the issue isn't confused further. But I like that she noted the precise reason Zaru was gonna get his crew killed before anyone else. She's also a sociopath, but an insightful high-functioning one.

For the record, I'm disappointed they brought Georgiou into the future. The one good thing is it makes a Section 31 series unlikely, because she's a literal cannibal, and the worst choice for a series lead ever. But I don't want to have to see her every week on THIS show too. It's fun to watch her take down bad guys worse than her. But I hate her every second she's the worst person in the room. And that's usually.

Saru is quite a competent captain. Maybe somebody should note that somewhere.

I agree with Saru that Tilly makes a good first impression. She was in fact the only main character on the show I immediately liked in her first appearance. Everyone else I had to get used to (or they improved the character later on like Stamets).

SO looking forward to next week and everybody comparing notes. I want to get the lowdown what Burnham and the Federation have been up to. ****1/2.
 

Palin Dromos

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For the record, I'm disappointed they brought Georgiou into the future. The one good thing is it makes a Section 31 series unlikely, because she's a literal cannibal, and the worst choice for a series lead ever. But I don't want to have to see her every week on THIS show too. It's fun to watch her take down bad guys worse than her. But I hate her every second she's the worst person in the room. And that's usually.
Who says Section 31 hasn't survived the 900+ year time span?
This time period certainly seems like an environment where their methods would thrive. And given the questionable status of the Federation, S31 remnants could be even more fanatical in their warped ideals.
If this is a future where the Discovery is trying to reignite the Federation, a S31 show that has it's characters working towards the same goal in an opposing manner could prove fascinating.
I gather that "grim" isn't your thing Fone Bone, but I think it's fertile ground...er space...

Also loved how "Captainy" Saru seemed as he and Tilly were out on their walk.
 

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Episode 32. (3x3) People of Earth
Reunited with Burnham, Discovery heads to Earth to find out what has happened to the Federation in the last thousand years.
 

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Star Trek: Discovery "People Of Earth"

Unlike the first two weeks I didn't love it. But I was sort of able to sit back and absorb what was going on to get a better feel for it.

Burnham and Book not being a ship strikes me as nothing but pure stubbornness on both of their ends. I think they believe (correctly I might add) sex would turn their extraordinary friendship ordinary. Is that something worth risking? And if that happened, is that actually all right? Are they making their friendship a bigger deal in their heads than it actually is? To be determined.

Good news and bad news on the Trill. The idea that it's a human hybrid sort of goes with the idea that Trill Symbionts were always a LOT easier to insert and use than the higher ups on Trill ever wanted the public to believe on Deep Space Nine. While it's sort of consistent with that conspiracy, I don't like it because it devalues what makes that SPECIES unique to begin with. It was still a good twist to make the character Admiral Tull.

The bad thing is she's essentially a female Wesley Crusher. And don't give me lip for branding a capable woman as a Mary Sue. This is not toxic masculinity speaking. She is literally a kid who is smarter than and running rings around the adults. If she WEREN'T a Trill she'd be unbearably insufferable. As it stands, she is merely bearably insufferable.

The last shot of Earth was interesting because it looked like things had barely changed. I feel that's okay. I mean we have been promised flying cars since the 1950's. But the reality is the landscapes of our cities and towns have been somewhat static since the 1940's and WWII, and I think it's totally possible that Earth designs and buildings may have merely stopped at the 22nd and 23rd Century building and vehicle designs. But hey, Boothby's tree is bigger, and there are spaceboats in the Frisco Harbor, so things ARE a little different!

I'm still trying to wrap my brain around the idea that Earth left the Federation. Speaking as somebody living in America in 2020 I can totally believe an "evolved" Earth's response to the Burn is "We can take care of ourselves." That's totally believable, if entirely outside of Gene Roddenberry's beliefs and message. But I like this season of Discovery and the last season of Picard because they are tweaking and revising that message to speak to modern audiences. Here is my idea of good Star Trek: Showing humans working their problems out and doing the right thing because it makes the most amount of sense. Here is my idea of bad Star Trek: Humans do the right thing because humanity is inherently good and genetically evolved to the point where temptation to do the wrong thing doesn't exist. That was pretty much Roddenberry's entire tenure on TNG until his death, and you know what? I think it's a lousy moral. One of the coolest things about Star Trek to me is showing how and why working together and using diplomacy solves problems. For The Next Generation a lot of the conflict was gutted because the humans were ALWAYS right and supposedly genetically perfect and evolved from their mistakes. I don't care about or believe in a future in which humans somehow genetically shed "badness" only 300 or 400 years in the future, as if evolution speeds up randomly for virtuous species. What I care about is a future society of people who want and CHOOSE to do the right thing, not because their species has evolved to the point where it's the only thing they know. But because it's what they want and what they choose to do. I want to believe in a future society where we learn from out mistakes because we still make them. The idea that humans magically evolved away from racism, greed, and hatred in only 300 years is not science fiction. It's fantasy. It doesn't follow any scientific example of evolution that ever existed. And I like the imperfect humans this season and on Picard because Star Trek is now plausible to me. The future it shows does not strike me as occurring through magical thinking. Realistic behaving humans, makes a bright future for humanity easier to believe. Why Roddenberry didn't know or understand this himself is something that has confused me ever since I started watching the shows religiously in the 1990's. I think if you want to create a sprawling epic about the future psychology of humanity, you should at least understand how real-life people actually work, right?

For those who hate these Kurtzman shows and believe Eugene Roddenberry is hurting his father's legacy by signing off and producing them, I think it's just the opposite. You can argue about the quality of the shows. You can rage against the sloppy, infuriating continuity mistakes. But I think the new shows solidified Gene's legacy simply by showing the best of humanity more realistically than he did. I can barely watch most of the run of Next Gen, Enterprise, or Voyager without thinking almost all of the characters are a bunch of squares. You do not have to have every single person be perfect to portray a good future for humanity worth fighting for. I found the future of much of the first five Trek series besides Deep Space Nine cold, boring, and lifeless. And I don't feel that about the new shows, whatever their faults.

I also never understood the point of synthahol. It tastes like alcohol but doesn't get you drunk? Why would anyone drink that? Another unbelievable thing Roddenberry did NOT think through.

I'm not going to give this episode a rave review or a blockbuster grade. It felt very much like sort of a break before the season truly gets underway. But I want anyone who hates this show to understand that as bad as the continuity is, it's doing more for the legacy of Star Trek than Voyager and Enterprise ever did because I believe in this future, and I believe it's a place we can get to. And I think that's best thing any Star Trek show can do, and that's why I enjoy this one. ***1/2.
 

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Episode 33. (3x4) Forget Me Not
Burnham and Adira visit the Trill homeworld while Saru's efforts on the Discovery to help the crew reconnect yield surprises.
 

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Star Trek: Discovery "Forget Me Not"

Let's see. I adored the Trill stuff, but was unhappy with the stuff with Stamets and Detmer. We'll get to that in a bit. But we'll talk about Adira's stuff first.

I thought it was lovely, and sweet, and romantic overall. My favorite kind of story.

Good Trill continuity: The make-up is correct, suggesting licensing issues with Paramount are past-tense, which would be good news if and when we see the Klingons again. Bad Trill continuity: They seem to have forgotten that in season 3 of Deep Space Nine it was revealed one of the deepest conspiracies of the Trill Homeworld is that 90 percent of the Trill population was actually capable of Hosting Symbionts, and the information was kept secret because it would have started a black market for them. If there are no longer enough Hosts for Symbionts in the 30th Century, the only in-canon way that could be true is if the devastation to Trill mentioned here meant there were actually fewer Trill citizens left compared to Symbionts, which also doesn't track considering how rare and special Symbionts were also considered on DS9. I think the show actually messed up. But it's not the most egregious error the show has ever made. But it makes me unhappy.

The rest of the Trill stuff was so great because it didn't contradict much of anything else (but since when can Symbionts fly?) and added to our knowledge of the species and how they work. I also found it interesting the precarious position Discovery was placed in by contacting them at all. They were a very peaceful species on DS9. But it's been 700 years since then. No guarantee their entire political situation hasn't changed. And in fact, at first the Trill Council is a threat to Andira because they believe she's an abomination, and it's hinted they want to take the Tal Symbiont back, thereby killing Adira. Saru's caution was warranted. In fact, it could be argued he lowered the Yellow Alert far too quickly.

It's cool Andira's Trill boyfriend was transgendered.

The color of the Trill sky is wrong, but Star Trek is famous for inconsistently coloring the skies on their different planets from various incarnations. This is not a mere Discovery problem.

It's good to see Twin Peak's Kenneth Welsh is still alive. He wasn't in the relaunch (for obvious reasons) but Windom Earle was one of the best things about Season 2.

I was unhappy with the blow-up at the dinner table. It's not exactly a canon mistake. But it was a mistake. I do not agree with Gene Roddenberry that conflict between humans is inherently bad. It's what great drama is actually about, and Gene handicapped the entire franchise for an entirely misguided moral. But... BUT... I believe that it should be possible for Star Trek characters to share a nice meal without nearly coming to blows. That's the entire selling point of Star Trek characters. Tilly saying this was her entire family growing up made me unhappy as well, but I especially disliked Stamet's reaction to Detmer's horrible Haiku.

If Star Trek were being properly Star Trek in that moment, Stamets would not be getting offended and upset, and defensively bragging about what he's accomplished for the ship. Clearly there is something psychologically or medically wrong with Detmer, possibly involving her cybernetic implants. A Star Trek character would recognize this was out of character for Detmer, and be concerned about her instead and ask if she was all right. And I feel like Stamets is the most inconsistently written character on the show. Technically, he's my favorite character. But they can't seem to ever decide if he's the ship's hardass or gentle odd duck. And he can't be both. Once he turned into the sweet guy he did in the middle of Season 1, I don't believe they should be backsliding him to the jerk he initially was in the early part of the show. It's not even that it's bad character progression. It's just I LOVE the odd duck, and he's the reason I love the character. Why they want to bring back the character the audience roundly disliked puzzles me greatly, especially because there doesn't seem to be a rhyme or reason to it.

But yes, this IS Star Trek, and everyone resolves their differences at the end like they are supposed to. But it never should have gotten that far. Star Trek characters should have had empathy and been alarmed by Detmer saying something outrageously out of character. They would immediately think she was having a stroke or that there was something medically wrong with her (which there clearly is). I don't like that the characters don't automatically do that. It's partly to drag out the mystery about what IS medically wrong with her (I suspect it has something to do with the Sphere) but Star Trek characters should have been empathetic to what she was saying rather than angry.

But honestly, the Trill stuff intrigued me so much I'm not going to let that bother me TOO much. I was unhappy with it but it wasn't what most of the episode was. What most of the episode was is something I very much liked. ****.
 
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Episode 34. (3x5) Die Trying
After reuniting with what remains of Starfleet and the Federation, the U.S.S. Discovery and its crew must prove that a 930 year old crew and starship are exactly what this new future needs.
 

Fone Bone

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Star Trek: Discovery "Die Trying"

This show is now my everything. I don't love it more than Deep Space Nine yet. But it's close. It's also just inched ahead of Picard for me.

Even if it is a tenth of what it was in its prime the one thing the Federation is always able to do is impress me. I was wowed by that. Freaking Voyager?! Are you kidding me?!

I like Culber telling Burnham to talk to the doctor because Nhan was being dishonest with him because they shared a culture. That is not a Federation moral. At all. But it was probably correct.

Speaking of which, I think the creepy Federation dude did some brainwashing of Georgieu. He's Cronenberg, man. He does stuff like that.

I found it interesting that the only time Georgieu seemed to reveal anything herself was when she heard the Terran Empire fells centuries ago, and that nobody has made contact with the Mirror Universe in over 500 years. Seems like we won't be getting a 900 years in the future Mirror Universe crossover. I think that's a missed opportunity. If I was writing a return to the Mirror Universe I would have that Universe in this time period be as harmonious as the Federation was in OUR time, but perhaps on a much grander scale. I would love to see things working swimmingly in the Mirror Universe while they are going so badly for us.

I love that Saru seems touched that Canamar joined the Federation. That makes me happy too. Nhan's people turning Federation also made HER happy.

More TV-PG Star Trek please. I don't demand every episode not be TV-MA. But some of them, all right?

This show is doing my favorite thing from Deep Space Nine: Exploring the long-term political dynamics of the fictional Universe. But because it's set 900 years in the future, it isn't bound to the canon. The most exciting thing about Deep Space Nine was all of the interesting places it was allowed to take the Alpha Quadrant while it was the only show set there. I predict similar amounts of happiness in store for this series for having an entire timeframe to play with.

Honestly, Discovery's first two season weren't bad television. But they were bad Star Trek. Full stop. If they had no ties to the canon and it was an entirely new sci-fi franchise I would have loved those seasons unreservedly. Instead they came across as sloppy and ill-researched. Where are the Okudas when you need them?

Setting this season 900 years in the future, and allowing IT to dictate the canon, instead of being forced to try and live within it makes all the difference in the world. It turns a good TV show into a great Star Trek show. Which is just about all I ever wanted. *****.
 

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Episode 35. (3x6) Scavengers
After receiving a message from Book, Burnham and Georgiou embark on a rogue mission to find him, leaving Saru to pick up the pieces with Admiral Vance. Meanwhile, Stamets forms an unexpected bond with Adira.
 
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Fone Bone

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Star Trek: Discovery "Scavengers"

Burnham got demoted. Sad because Saru clearly didn't want to do it.

That is one big cat.

First live-action Bajoran we've seen in the Kurtzman era. No earring, probably because he was a slave.

My favorite stuff was the stuff between Stamets and Adira. Very cute.

Nice episode. ***1/2.
 

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Episode 36. (3x7) Unification III
While grappling with the fallout of her recent actions, and what her future might hold, Burnham agrees to represent the Federation in an intense debate about the release of politically sensitive – but highly valuable – Burn data.
 

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Star Trek: Discovery “Unification III”

I'm trying to think of a proper superlative to describe that episode and I'm doing badly. Magnificent? That word suggests it was too grand for me to be able to relate to. Perfect? That suggests it wasn't messy. I responded to the episode not because it was great for a specific reason, but because it had many wonderful things going on in it at once.

I very much loved being put through the emotional wringer with Michael and Gabriella. I'm not sure if the Absolute Candor stuff was truly as effective as the producers of Star Trek: Picard hoped it was. But it resonated 800 years in the future with Burnham's mother using it to finally be a good Mom. What I love about how antagonistic she is in that quorum is that Michael is a bit outraged her mother seems to be undercutting her argument, and setting her against the council. The truth is Michael was NOT arguing in good faith, and her mother basically forced her to (which turned the tide with the Navar President). Well-wrung (and earned) drama which led to an amazing mother / daughter goodbye scene, as well as taking the Discovery one step closer to learning the truth.

I am very much in favor of the political perils on the former planet of Vulcan. The entire reason Deep Space Nine was my favorite Star Trek show is because it was literally the only one of the first five Trek series to actually explore the politics of the Alpha Quadrant. Picard did that a little in its first season, and Year 3 of Discovery is going even further. But suggesting politics and alliances can be tenuous and messy is a Star Trek message I very much like and approve of. I want to believe in the better future. But in order to believe in it, it needs to be plausible and not just a case of magical thinking. If the Federation or the Unification of Navar are held together, I want there to be solid, observable reasons for that. We need actual examples to work towards and learn from. Not big wishes that we can never realize because there is no credibility to them.

The stuff with learning the history of what Spock (and later Picard) started with Reunification was another reminder that the reason the first two seasons arguably sucked, (as least as far as being good Star Trek), is because they were forced to try and stay within a fixed canon and failing miserably at it. 900 years from now, and that have the sandbox entirely to themselves, and are coming up with and adding great things to the canon. I especially love the footage of Leonard Nimoy from The Next Generation. One of the things I am unhappy with regarding Anson Mount and Ethan Peck as Pike and Spock is that the show could easily be confused with a reboot as long as they are doing stuff like that. The Nimoy footage more clearly solidifies the integrity of the series' relationship to the canon at large. Now if we could only add some normal-looking Klingons to the mix.

The episode title says this is a third part to two episodes that aired in 1991. It may actually surpass Twin Peaks in the longest wait ever for a television resolution, although the upcoming Strange New Worlds debuting nearly 65 years after The Cage says it will break both records easily.

I like Stamets' initial reaction to Tilly saying she was offered a promotion, but realizing and trying to suss out how much of his boss that would make her. He instantly declares taking orders from her weird, which is something I love. Saru choosing her was interesting for one reason: She asks him to clarify if he believes she the most qualified for the position, or if he's picking her because she'd be the most compliant, which is necessary after the messes Burnham made. I like that Saru diplomatically chooses not to answer that specifically, and suggests he's offering the job because she is the best candidate for this point in time. I like that because it begs the question. I think if the question is raised but not answered, it's actually plausible that she would be offered a position like this despite being the ship's resident hot mess.

While we speaking of messes, I did not like the way Burnham was conducting herself around the Vulcans and Romulans. Invoking that quorum was a dirty move, and I was little astounded that she believed she could walk in there without knowing anything that had happened to that entire world in the past 800 years, and convince them that the Federation is good and their friend simply by being Spock's sister. The thing that angers me, and this is something not resolved by the end of the episode, is that I'm far from convinced the Federation, as it is currently being run, can be trusted at all. I think Saru and Burnham are taking a LOT of the luxuries and gee-whiz technology the Future Federation offers at face value, without questioning it or why it drove both Earth and Navar off to begin with. And she's using the fact that she's Spock's sister to gain favor as an emotional appeal and doesn't get how tacky that would be to Vulcans and how mad it would make them.

I think her lesson is only learned when she realizes what she's asking could potentially tear the Romulan and Vulcan factions on Navar apart, and that the research isn't actually worth that. I don't think the episode needed to give her the Participation Trophy of the President sneaking her the data at the end, but I recognized Burnham finally seeing that the Universe is no longer something that will simply trust whatever the Federation says as a big moment for her.

Speaking of her being Spock's famous sister, that feels wrong to the canon too. I kind of was under the impression that the season 2 finale sort of retconned her history out of the Spock family, and that's why no-one had heard of or mentioned her previously. Gabriella being present actually explains that discrepancy, but I am not happy Burnham or Saru weren't smart enough to catch it before she revealed herself. The show has the worst continuity of any Star Trek show ever. It can't even keep stuff IT set up straight.

But the episode was messy, and political, and real, and filled with heart and genuine emotion. I missed being moved by Star Trek, and I haven't been since the days of TNG and DS9. This season of this show and Picard are basically what I have been begging Star Trek to be while it was obsessed with prequels, reboots, and Lost in Space adventures. These two current Star Trek shows are everything I want my Star Trek to be. I responded to Picard immediately, and it took this show a couple of years to find its footing, but I have not been as satisfied with this franchise since 1999 and What You Leave Behind aired. I am very glad to be able to obsess over my nerdiest fandom again. It very much takes me back to the pleasures of my youth. *****.
 

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Episode 37. (3x8) The Sanctuary
Burnham and the U.S.S. Discovery crew travel to Book’s home planet to help rescue it from Osyraa, the formidable leader of the Emerald Chain. Meanwhile, Stamets and Adira continue their search for valuable information on the origin of the Burn.
 

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Star Trek: Discovery "The Sanctuary"

That was pretty good. There aren't a ton of ship to ship battles on Star Trek, but it's very clear special effects have gone light years ahead of where they were in the Deep Space Nine era. It all looks very impressive.

I'm really starting to dig the Andorian Rinn. He strikes me as a secret hero masquerading as a pariah.

Osira is a pretty scary bad guy. She's super hot too which is important when casting an Orion woman.

Stamets' stuff with Adira continues to be amazing. Here they tell Stamets they are transgender for the first time. It's nice to learn the proper pronouns for them.

Detmer did a great job this episode. I'm rooting for her.

On the flipside I've had about enough of Georgiou. Every time she speaks a great Jeff Winger quote springs immediately to mind: "Sean Penn called. He says to dial it back." Seriously. She never quits with it and it's so frustrating and annoying. I'm sick to death of this character. Why is she even there except to ruin every part of every episode she appears in? And they want to center a show around her? Yeah, no. Whatever Section 31 is about, I can tell you this: It's gonna suck with Georgiou as the lead character. She sucks all of the oxygen out of the room and makes everything worse and about herself. She is literally the Donald Trump of Star Trek. I don't understand WHY anyone would give her a show. It beggars belief. She is awful.

But outside of her stuff the episode was pretty good. Do not look forward to the episode centered around her next week. ***1/2.
 

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Episode 38. (3x9) Terra Firma, Part I
The U.S.S. Discovery crew journey to a mysterious planet in hopes of finding a cure for Georgiou’s deteriorating condition. Stamets and Adira make a stunning breakthrough with the newly acquired Burn data.
 

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Star Trek: Discovery "Terra Firma, Part 1"

Are they suggesting rewriting the history of the Mirror Universe? If so, would that undo every single Mirror Universe episode and change the entire timeline? Or is the stuff we saw on TOS and DS9 part of the new timeline Georgiou is creating?

Is what is happening even real? And what is the deal with Carl?

Was the Starfleet Officer who traveled from the Kelvin timeline a Yuridian? We haven't seen them in awhile.

I'll tell you one thing about Mirror Burham: She is legitimately frightening. I also suspect she may also be completely insane.

No clue where we go from here, but I'll give that a positive grade simply for undoing Mirror Saru's totally gross death. ****.
 

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Episode 39. (3x10) Terra Firma, Part II
Georgiou uncovers the true depths of the plot against her, leading her to a revelation about how deeply her time on the U.S.S. Discovery truly changed her.
 

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It's been one year since NickRewind block ceased the operations.
it's that day of the year!
Anyone else getting reboot fatigue at this point? From continuity reboots to unnecessary revivals and even outright renewals of shows that ended perfectly, it seems like every show is coming back at this point whether we like it or not. It's starting to worry me about future creativity and originality and make me wonder whatever started this trend.
Well, changing my pfp from my usual Puyo Fever 7 picture-escue my main OC pfp (for the first time) to one another.
and yes, i'll be using that until Feb 15 (the day after Himespetchi's birthday).

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