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Saturday Morning What-Ifs to Go Crazy On

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Tacomaster

Member
The point of this thread is to make up what if scenarios for Saturday Morning cartoon blocks and channels. Example:

In 2001, after losing the rights to the previous Fox Kids library to Disney, Fox teams up with 4Kids Entertainment to create FoxBox, a 4-hour block programmed by 4Kids, to replace it. It premiered in 2002. In late 2004, plans to relaunch FoxBox as "4Kids TV" are scrapped when DiC Entertainment cancels their current syndication deal in order to supply FoxBox with programming- in particular, E/I content. FoxBox's relaunch instead occurs with the FoxBox name intact on January 22, 2005, expanding FoxBox to a six-hour block on both Saturdays and Sundays, from 7 AM to 1 PM. The first hour and a half of programming of both blocks consists of E/I programming primarily from DiC's library, while the remaining four and a half hours being a mixture of programs from both 4Kids and DiC's library. Due to this, when CBS split from Viacom in late 2005, and Nickelodeon stopped programming for the block in 2006, programming for the CBS block went to Corus Entertainment-owned Nelvana, who had previously programmed CBS's Kidshow block in the late 90s. Qubo is also affected, as Nelvana was one of the original distributors for the Qubo block. In 2008, Cookie Jar Group acquired DiC Entertainment, and their programming was added to the block, including Dark Oracle and MagiNation. In 2011, 4Kids filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, and the rights of multiple shows- and their share in the FoxBox block- was transferred to Saban Brands. In 2012, FoxBox was relaunched again, with Saban shows such as Power Rangers added to the lineup. On September 6, 2014, FoxBox is shut down, and is replaced the following week by Steve Rotfeld Productions's Xploration Station, an E/I-exclusive block oriented at teenagers.
 

Zorak Masaki

Well-Known Member
This is more of an older one, but what if Filmation stayed in the Saturday Morning market in the 80s (After Gilligan's Planet and Blackstar in 82, they went exclusively to the syndicated market)? Would He-Man, She-Ra, Ghostbusters, and Bravestarr move to Saturday Mornings? Would the company be able to stay afloat?
 

Tacomaster

Member
This is more of an older one, but what if Filmation stayed in the Saturday Morning market in the 80s (After Gilligan's Planet and Blackstar in 82, they went exclusively to the syndicated market)? Would He-Man, She-Ra, Ghostbusters, and Bravestarr move to Saturday Mornings? Would the company be able to stay afloat?
I was more thinking your own answers to your own questions, but I don’t think He-Man and stuff would survive on network, as syndication can get away with more content like the He-Man stuff.
 
The point of this thread is to make up what if scenarios for Saturday Morning cartoon blocks and channels. Example:

In 2001, after losing the rights to the previous Fox Kids library to Disney, Fox teams up with 4Kids Entertainment to create FoxBox, a 4-hour block programmed by 4Kids, to replace it. It premiered in 2002. In late 2004, plans to relaunch FoxBox as "4Kids TV" are scrapped when DiC Entertainment cancels their current syndication deal in order to supply FoxBox with programming- in particular, E/I content. FoxBox's relaunch instead occurs with the FoxBox name intact on January 22, 2005, expanding FoxBox to a six-hour block on both Saturdays and Sundays, from 7 AM to 1 PM. The first hour and a half of programming of both blocks consists of E/I programming primarily from DiC's library, while the remaining four and a half hours being a mixture of programs from both 4Kids and DiC's library. Due to this, when CBS split from Viacom in late 2005, and Nickelodeon stopped programming for the block in 2006, programming for the CBS block went to Corus Entertainment-owned Nelvana, who had previously programmed CBS's Kidshow block in the late 90s. Qubo is also affected, as Nelvana was one of the original distributors for the Qubo block. In 2008, Cookie Jar Group acquired DiC Entertainment, and their programming was added to the block, including Dark Oracle and MagiNation. In 2011, 4Kids filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, and the rights of multiple shows- and their share in the FoxBox block- was transferred to Saban Brands. In 2012, FoxBox was relaunched again, with Saban shows such as Power Rangers added to the lineup. On September 6, 2014, FoxBox is shut down, and is replaced the following week by Steve Rotfeld Productions's Xploration Station, an E/I-exclusive block oriented at teenagers.
How about this? What if Fox Kids airs as a 5-hour Saturday Morning block to compete with Disney's One Saturday Morning and Kids' WB!. Fox Kids stopped, but Fox Box still a 5-hour block and add Hamtaro to the mix.
 

Tacomaster

Member
How about this? What if Fox Kids airs as a 5-hour Saturday Morning block to compete with Disney's One Saturday Morning and Kids' WB!. Fox Kids stopped, but Fox Box still a 5-hour block and add Hamtaro to the mix.
Neat idea. I was thinking of shortening the new FoxBox to five hours, from seven to noon.
 

JoeMabbon

Autobot Strategist
I've always wondered about the Toonami Rising Sun block. What if Toonami evolved into a Saturday Morning block as opposed to a Saturday night block?
 

Fone Bone

Matt Zimmer
Oooh, I've got a good one. What if ABC and Fox Kids were still airing Saturday and weekday afternoon cartoons? What could we expect from the Disney / Fox merger?
 

Tacomaster

Member
I've always wondered about the Toonami Rising Sun block. What if Toonami evolved into a Saturday Morning block as opposed to a Saturday night block?
Good one. Maybe they wouldn’t have died as quickly?
Oooh, I've got a good one. What if ABC and Fox Kids were still airing Saturday and weekday afternoon cartoons? What could we expect from the Disney / Fox merger?
Well, they’d probably have some E/I in the lineup- 3 hours a week. ABC would be Disney reruns. If Fox still had the Fox Kids library and Fox Family, it’d probably just be Fox Family reruns. If not, or after the Disney/Fox kerger, 4Kids or Vortexx.
 

stephane dumas

Well-Known Member
What if NBC in the 1980s decide to request more episodes of the 1982 Hulk cartoon along with Spider-man and his Amazing Friends to be less dependent on the Smurfs?

Then, later in the decade, what if NBC had gived the green light for a proposed X-Men cartoon? I guess Screech and the other folks of Saved by the Bell would had got less exposure.
 

alex dahlseid

New Member
What if Cartoon Network partnered with PBS/PBS Kids it will be jointed block
Wusf Kids, Cn shows knd,billy and Mandy etc along with existing ribert and Robert wonderworld,t&f,etc TPT pbs will get older and newer shows of Cn examples KND,summer camp island,billy and Mandy etc
this is very similar to whole nick on cbs
 

Tacomaster

Member
What if Cartoon Network partnered with PBS/PBS Kids it will be jointed block
Wusf Kids, Cn shows knd,billy and Mandy etc along with existing ribert and Robert wonderworld,t&f,etc TPT pbs will get older and newer shows of Cn examples KND,summer camp island,billy and Mandy etc
this is very similar to whole nick on cbs
Nuh Uh. This will never happen even in fantasy.
 
What if CBS aired Cartoon Cartoons as a Saturday Morning block from 2002 to 2005 and have CBS aired their own version of Tickle-U as Saturday Morning block for 2005-2006
 
What if:

  • Disney own the TV rights to Captain Underpants (before DreamWorks getting the rights) and made an animated series, "The Adventures of Captain Underpants" for One Saturday Morning on ABC (Later ABC Kids) from 1999 to 2003 (reruns from 2003 to 2004)
  • ABC Kids has shows like House of Mouse (2002-2003), Wizards of Waverly Place (2007-2011), Phineas and Ferb (2008-2011), Cory in the House (2007-2011), Yin Yang Yo! (2007-2010) and have W.I.T.C.H. to air longer (2005-2006)
  • Fox Kids expands their lineup from four hours to five hours, to compete with Disney's One Saturday Morning on ABC and Kids' WB!
  • Fox Box (later 4Kids TV) stays as five-hours block and adding 4Kids dub of Hamtaro, Viewtiful Joe, etc.
  • Nick Jr. on CBS (later Nick on CBS) remains four-hours block, and adding shows for Nick on CBS like Little Bill and The Fairly Oddparents.
  • Ready, Set, Learn as a sub-block for Discovery Kids on NBC.
 

Tacomaster

Member
What if:

  • Disney own the TV rights to Captain Underpants (before DreamWorks getting the rights) and made an animated series, "The Adventures of Captain Underpants" for One Saturday Morning on ABC (Later ABC Kids) from 1999 to 2003 (reruns from 2003 to 2004)
  • ABC Kids has shows like House of Mouse (2002-2003), Wizards of Waverly Place (2007-2011), Phineas and Ferb (2008-2011), Cory in the House (2007-2011), Yin Yang Yo! (2007-2010) and have W.I.T.C.H. to air longer (2005-2006)
  • Fox Kids expands their lineup from four hours to five hours, to compete with Disney's One Saturday Morning on ABC and Kids' WB!
  • Fox Box (later 4Kids TV) stays as five-hours block and adding 4Kids dub of Hamtaro, Viewtiful Joe, etc.
  • Nick Jr. on CBS (later Nick on CBS) remains four-hours block, and adding shows for Nick on CBS like Little Bill and The Fairly Oddparents.
  • Ready, Set, Learn as a sub-block for Discovery Kids on NBC.
One at a time please
 
First ABC.

What if before DreamWorks, Disney owns the TV rights to Captain Underpants and make an animated series, "The Adventures of Captain Underpants" for Disney's One Saturday Morning on ABC, later ABC Kids from 1999 to 2003 (reruns from 2003 to 2004)
As for ABC Kids, What if ABC Kids has shows like House of Mouse (from 2002 to 2003), Wizards of Waverly Place (from 2007 to 2011), Cory in the House (from 2007 to 2011), Yin Yang Yo! (2007 to 2010) and Phineas and Ferb (from 2008 to 2011) and have W.I.T.C.H. air longer on ABC Kids (2005 tp 2007)
 

Tacomaster

Member
First ABC.

What if before DreamWorks, Disney owns the TV rights to Captain Underpants and make an animated series, "The Adventures of Captain Underpants" for Disney's One Saturday Morning on ABC, later ABC Kids from 1999 to 2003 (reruns from 2003 to 2004)
As for ABC Kids, What if ABC Kids has shows like House of Mouse (from 2002 to 2003), Wizards of Waverly Place (from 2007 to 2011), Cory in the House (from 2007 to 2011), Yin Yang Yo! (2007 to 2010) and Phineas and Ferb (from 2008 to 2011) and have W.I.T.C.H. air longer on ABC Kids (2005 tp 2007)
I’ll do my best...
Captain Underpants would later air in reruns on Disney Channel, Toon Disney, Jetix, and Disney XD, and would have a moral tied into the episode for ABC’s E/I content. It would still be controversial because of the authority-defying protagonists(George and Harold) and toilet humor(Hey, it wouldn’t be CU without it!), as well as being based of the CU series, banned in many schools.
Many of the other shows are either skipped for not being educational by affiliates(House of Mouse, Yin Yang Yo, W.I.T.C.H.) or only have select episodes with morals wedged in(Cory Cory Cory in the House, Phineas and Ferb).

As for the others:
What if:
  • Fox Kids expands their lineup from four hours to five hours, to compete with Disney's One Saturday Morning on ABC and Kids' WB!
  • Fox Box (later 4Kids TV) stays as five-hours block and adding 4Kids dub of Hamtaro, Viewtiful Joe, etc.
  • Nick Jr. on CBS (later Nick on CBS) remains four-hours block, and adding shows for Nick on CBS like Little Bill and The Fairly Oddparents.
  • Ready, Set, Learn as a sub-block for Discovery Kids on NBC.
Affiliates have a bit of a problem with Fox taking up five hours of the weekend block as well as a weekday block, so to compensate for this, Fox makes the weekend block mandatory, but the weekday block optional, and the weekend block has three out of the block’s five hours with educational content. Fox pulls an ABC by managing to make Power Rangers take up an hour of the block and claiming it as educational through the positive message of teamwork it gives off, as well as showing the original Mighty Morphin episodes through the first half hour of the Rangers portion(which was overdosed on morals such as eating right, telling the truth, etc.) and giving the newest series of each year(taking up the second half hour) more Aesops. Other shows included are Sherlock Holmes in the 22nd Century, Magic School Bus, and the returns of Bobby’s World and Carmen Sandiego.

FoxBox/4Kids may or may not exist due to this, but if it does, they do not have Hamtaro, but they may have more educational content to satisfy affiliates, and they probably have Viewtiful Joe, which I have looked up. It fits.

Fairly OddParents, not having many morals, is not on the Nick on CBS block. Instead, SpongeBob SquarePants, one of Nick’s biggest shows, surpassing Rugrats(which was sometimes on the block), is on the block instead, since it has a surprising amount of positive and important lessons and morals in the earlier seasons(that were still running during the block), such as facing the consequences of your actions (Mermaid Man and Barnacle Boy IV, No Free Rides, Squeaky Boots), the grass isn't always greener somewhere else (Nature Pants, Squidville, The Algae is Always Greener), be yourself (Ripped Pants, Big Pink Loser, and again Nature Pants), jumping to conclusions about someone or something can have dire consequences (Sandy's Rocket, Nasty Patty,Wormy), not to curse (Sailor Mouth), not to take advantage of your friends (Can You Spare a Dime, I'm With Stupid and to a lesser extent, Prehibernation Week), and not to touch things that aren't yours unless instructed (Life of Crime). Little Bill is on there, though, which is incredibly worrying in hindsight.

Ready Set Learn lasts about an hour on NBC and due to FCC laws of scheduling or something, some shows outlast being on the DK and TLC versions.

As for your CN hypothesis, in addition to CBS owning Nick at the time, CN doesn’t have very many educational shows. In fact, one of the reasons Tickle U was shot down is because the shows weren’t educational. Also, if any CN shows were to be rerun on network TV, they would be on fellow Warner-owned network, The WB, through its Kids’ WB! block.

And as for the PBS and CN partnership, I suppose it might work, but instead of CN shows airing on PBS(like I said before, not happening- CN isn’t exactly educational), PBS cartoons(and from 2007 to around 2012 or so, live action shows) would air on CN from 2005 onward instead of Tickle U being a thing. Heck, if they’re technically live action but use obviously cartoony puppets(Sesame Street, LazyTown- which is literally owned by Turner, the Warner division that runs CN) or have models or puppets/animatronics and no humans(TUGS, early Thomas) could be shown as well. This leads to new Sesame episodes being moved to CN instead of fellow Warner network HBO, which could potentially lead to Fraggle Rock making a return on CN instead of HBO, it’s original network, and more PBS shows having new episodes moved to CN(and maybe being produced by CN), and Fraggle Rock leading to more older Henson shows being in reruns(Wubbulous World of Dr. Seuss, Construction Site, Mopatop’s Shop). Of course, this is still controversial, as PBS is partnering with the corporation TimeWarner, and all this being on the same network that houses Robot Chicken and Family Guy at night. Instead of Sprout as we knew it existing, the PBS Kids Channel(which got its place taken by Sprout) could mutate into a US version of Cartoonito(the partnership’s eventual name, from CN International’s preschool thing), while the international versions could be the exclusive home for PBS content overseas. PBS Kids cartoons aimed at older audiences(Arthur, Maya and Miguel, Cyberchase) could be aired on CN proper instead.

What if NBC in the 1980s decide to request more episodes of the 1982 Hulk cartoon along with Spider-man and his Amazing Friends to be less dependent on the Smurfs?

Then, later in the decade, what if NBC had gived the green light for a proposed X-Men cartoon? I guess Screech and the other folks of Saved by the Bell would had got less exposure.
Well, they might be more successful, but X-Men would be a lot less cool and a whole lot cornier. And good luck with the E/I content!
 
That one goes for Kids' WB!

What if Hi Hi Puffy Ami Yumi was produced by Warner Bros. Animation and aired on Kids' WB!, instead of Cartoon Network. It premiered from 2004 to 2006, after The WB switch to the CW.
Also, having Duck Dodgers air on Kids' WB! from 2003 to 2006
 

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