3 Decades Later, There’s A New Rugrats Game For The Original Nintendo

wonderfly

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From the front page of AnimeSuperhero.com:

"3 Decades Later, There’s A New Rugrats Game For The Original Nintendo"​


Rugrats-NES-game-2.jpg



"There’s a new Rugrats video game coming out this year….for the original Nintendo, the “NES”! Yes, that’s right, nearly 30 years after Nintendo discontinued the NES system in North America and Europe (back in 1995) and nearly 20 years after the Rugrats series ended (on August 1st, 2004), there’s a new “NES” game.

Titled “Rugrats: Adventures in Gameland”, the game is the product of co-developers “The MIX Games” and “Wallride”, and features a “retro” pixelated platformer aesthetic making it look like it came from the NES catalog back in the late 80’s/early 90’s (though there is a toggle option to make the artwork look more clean and “hi-def” in appearance). The platformer game will be coming to the Playstation 4 and 5, the Xbox One, Xbox Series X and S, the Nintendo Switch and on PC. However, the unique spin on the game is that publisher “Limited Run Games” is releasing a physical version for the original Nintendo Entertainment System."

Read the full article here.

Anyone else want the "NES" version just for collector's sake?
 

Moe

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I just needed to share this link somewhere on the Nicktoons forum (as we can't mirror threads, for now). Over on the Video Game forum, we've got this discussion that I thought Classic Nickelodeon fans would appreciate:

"3 Decades Later, There’s A New Rugrats Game For The Original Nintendo"
Yeah, I saw it and I was surprised to see Rugrats didn't exist on NES, SNES and Sega Genesis.

First Rugrats game was Rugrats: Search for Reptar in 1998 on PS1.

There were some Nick shows made to SNES like Ren & Stimpy, Aaahh!!! Real Monsters and Rocko's.
 

Pooky

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I think it speaks to what a slow burn the success of the original show was that there had been 7 Ren & Stimpy games by the time the first Rugrats game came along.

It's..."interesting" shall we say that they're making a high profile tie-in that's very distinctly based on the original show and not the current one.

It looks cute. Time will tell if it's anything more substantial then that
 

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I think it speaks to what a slow burn the success of the original show was that there had been 7 Ren & Stimpy games by the time the first Rugrats game came along.

I didn't have cable in the early 90's, but I went over to friends and relative's house (where they did have cable), and Rugrats would be on TV. This would've been like from 1992 to 1994. The show was liked. The show was being watched.

But by the time of the first Rugrats movie (in 1998), the show was huge. A pop culture icon. I divide it up this way:

Early 90's: Ren & Stimpy era
Late 90's: Rugrats era
Early 2000's: Spongebob era
Late 2000's: Avatar era.

And I stopped paying attention after 2010. ;)

So yeah, the first Rugrats video game not coming out until 1998 sounds about right.

Rugrats_-_Search_for_Reptar_Coverart.png


Even if it had been a huge success immediately in 1991 (or maybe by 1992), I'm not sure there would've been an "NES" game. I think there would've been a "Super Nintendo" game though....
 

Moe

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I didn't have cable in the early 90's, but I went over to friends and relative's house (where they did have cable), and Rugrats would be on TV. This would've been like from 1992 to 1994. The show was liked. The show was being watched.
My parents have cable TV since I was born, exception of short time in 1995 (house we bought had no cable hookup so Time Warner had to add a line, so we used TV antenna for 3 months) and 2005-2017 (switched to Dish Network and later, DirecTV), and finally cut the cord for Hulu Live TV and later, YouTube TV in 2019. I didn't have strong interest in Rugrats in early 1990s as I was more into Doug and Rocko's, and it started to change in mid 1990s, I started to have strong interest in Rugrats, especially when they aired Vacation episode.

So yeah, the first Rugrats video game not coming out until 1998 sounds about right.
I saw it at Movie Gallery and rented it immediately, so they got nice free roam (sandbox) in Tommy's house. I rented several times because I loved their game.

Even if it had been a huge success immediately in 1991 (or maybe by 1992), I'm not sure there would've been an "NES" game. I think there would've been a "Super Nintendo" game though....
Disney Afternoon shows were made for NES in early 1990s and if game developers were in mood for Rugrats, so they would develop earlier. It did surprise me if Rugrats wasn't popular enough in early 1990s and it has with quality of episodes?
 

harry580

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im surprised that rugrats, one of the biggest nickelodeon ip at the time didn't have any sort of game for nes, snes & genesis even arcade game or pinball machine (then again, ren & stimpy didn't have either of the latters)
 

TnAdct1

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im surprised that rugrats, one of the biggest nickelodeon ip at the time didn't have any sort of game for nes, snes & genesis even arcade game or pinball machine (then again, ren & stimpy didn't have either of the latters)
I feel that part of this was due to the following:

1. Ren and Stimpy being the big name of Nicktoons at the time (thanks to its crossover appeal with older viewers).

2. Nickelodeon wanting to promote the newer Nicktoons as they premiered.

3. People not realizing just how popular Rugrats was with younger viewers until 1994.
 

Peter Paltridge

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Even if it had been a huge success immediately in 1991 (or maybe by 1992), I'm not sure there would've been an "NES" game. I think there would've been a "Super Nintendo" game though....
I think otherwise. Ren and Stimpy did get an NES game. Theoretically if a developer got a license to the full Nicktoon library at the time and wanted to take advantage of it, there could've been a Rugrats game back then (and a Doug game). The NES market didn't totally disappear until late 1994.
 

Pooky

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A lot of the library in the later (c.1991-1994) years of the NES were cartoon tie-ins. It has historically been the case that in the last years of a console, when it is being phased out in favour of a more powerful system, the game library starts skewing a lot younger (or at least this was certainly the case for the NES, the PS1 and PS2). I'm not quite sure what the basis for this is; systems being handed down to younger relatives?

Perhaps if there had been a Rugrats NES games it would have been one of those ones you'd have to remortgage your house to own a la Flintstones Surprise at Dinosaur Peak.
 

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3. People not realizing just how popular Rugrats was with younger viewers until 1994.
and I remembered Rugrats aired on Nick Jr in 1990s (start at 8 am in central time zone and after Rugrats, 80s Muppet Babies aired at 8:30 am).

I think otherwise. Ren and Stimpy did get an NES game. Theoretically if a developer got a license to the full Nicktoon library at the time and wanted to take advantage of it, there could've been a Rugrats game back then (and a Doug game). The NES market didn't totally disappear until late 1994.
Yes, back in 1993, NES was still alive and they sell new games at stores.

A lot of the library in the later (c.1991-1994) years of the NES were cartoon tie-ins. It has historically been the case that in the last years of a console, when it is being phased out in favour of a more powerful system, the game library starts skewing a lot younger (or at least this was certainly the case for the NES, the PS1 and PS2). I'm not quite sure what the basis for this is; systems being handed down to younger relatives?

Perhaps if there had been a Rugrats NES games it would have been one of those ones you'd have to remortgage your house to own a la Flintstones Surprise at Dinosaur Peak.
I think NES has bigger base that led developers to make games that is marketed to children and NES is cheaper to buy for parents. At that time, SNES was more toward to fans who are into fighting, beat 'em up and RPG. When popularity of NES went down, more developers moved to SNES and later, PS1.
 

Fone Bone

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and I remembered Rugrats aired on Nick Jr in 1990s (start at 8 am in central time zone and after Rugrats, 80s Muppet Babies aired at 8:30 am).


Yes, back in 1993, NES was still alive and they sell new games at stores.


I think NES has bigger base that led developers to make games that is marketed to children and NES is cheaper to buy for parents. At that time, SNES was more toward to fans who are into fighting, beat 'em up and RPG. When popularity of NES went down, more developers moved to SNES and later, PS1.
I dunno. I think SNES had a TON of great kids games. The Super Mario, Donkey Kong Country, and Kirby franchises were at their zenith, and they had a ton of Disney games too. Also most of the games on the system were easier than the NES "Nintendo Hard" ones, which was also more appealing to little kids.
 

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I dunno. I think SNES had a TON of great kids games. The Super Mario, Donkey Kong Country, and Kirby franchises were at their zenith, and they had a ton of Disney games too. Also most of the games on the system were easier than the NES "Nintendo Hard" ones, which was also more appealing to little kids.
Make sense, I think that has with Capcom make games exclusively on NES/GB like they did with Mega Man (Rockman).

You said about "Nintendo Hard" made me laughing and of course, NES games are very hard to beat, so someone broke controller or throw a punch on wall. What's great memories, lol.
 

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I have the Wikipedia entry on Nintendo Hard bookmarked. These are the games I avoid.

Fun Fact: I have actually cleared Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles without Game Genie. It's not about split second timing, like the other Nintendo Hard games. It's about the knowing the tricks.

 
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Moe

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I have the Wikipedia entry on Nintendo Hard bookmarked. These are the games I avoid.

Fun Fact: I have actually cleared Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles without Game Genie. It's not about split second timing, like the other Nintendo Hard games. It's about the knowing the tricks.

Yeah, I had to use cheats for hard games and I was very curious with NES games.

My opinion on cheating in video games are fine for single player but definitely not OK for online gaming.

Remember about Aladdin and Lion King on SNES? Many people said those games are hard.
 

Peter Paltridge

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"Nintendo Hard" wasn't a concept back then, it was all anyone knew. Most developers were practicing what they learned at the arcade, where games were supposed to be hard to drain quarters from players. For home consoles that wasn't a requirement anymore but it was just kinda "the standard" at that point.

I agree that 16-bit consoles was where games started getting easier, but not THAT much easier. In some cases there was a business reason to make them hard! Some were made with the rental market in mind, like The Lion King.
 

John Pannozzi

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I dunno. I think SNES had a TON of great kids games. The Super Mario, Donkey Kong Country, and Kirby franchises were at their zenith, and they had a ton of Disney games too. Also most of the games on the system were easier than the NES "Nintendo Hard" ones, which was also more appealing to little kids.
I think the point is that specifically when the SNES was new/fairly new (c. 1991-1994), the NES was a cheaper option for families to buy. Heck, in 1993, we got the redesigned Top Loader model of the system. Similar to the original PlayStation getting remodeled as the PSOne (complete with portable LCD screen) around the same time the PlayStation 2 emerged in 2000.

Re: Nicktoons games in the early-to-mid 1990s

I recall hearing that the SNES Rocko's Modern Life game began development before the show even premiered (and that's apparently why the game doesn't use any music from the show). I wonder if it's a similar case with the AAAHH! Real Monsters game.

As a brief aside, in retrospect, I find it a bit conspicuous that there was a mini-burst of Real Monsters merchandise (trading cards, toys, etc) around 1995 (right as the show's first season ended and leading into the beginning of its second season). Few of the other Nicktoons that came either shortly before or shortly after Real Monsters got the same push. I guess Real Monsters was easier to merchandise in a time when monsters and gross-out sensibilities were big in the toy world. Not that I'm complaining, as I like Real Monsters alot (I just wish something like Rocko got half as much attention back in the day).

A tangent about the 32-bit and 64-bit era:

On another side, it has felt that to me that right around the early of the PlayStation 1 and Saturn (broadly 1994-1998 or so, but mostly around 1997), it seems to me that there were fewer games based on kid-centric animated series (at least American ones).

Like Tiny Toons had a handful of games, Animaniacs only had a smaller handful, Pinky & The Brain had two, and shows like Freakazoid and Histeria had none.

Likewise, in the three years between Real Monsters for SNES and Genesis, and Rugrats: Search for Reptar on PS1, there were no Nickelodeon-related titles on game consoles whatsoever.

I guess the 32-bit generation targeted teens and young adults more than previous eras did, hence the more notable cartoon-based games of that period (Reboot, Speed Racer and the game based on Disney's Hercules) were ones that appealed more to those demographics.

Heck, IINM, Search for Reptar was part of a marketing push from Sony for more kid and family-oriented games on PS1.
 

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I would never expect for Rugrats to have a NES-style released game in current time, but here we are.

Also about NES popularity, it hit it's peak (at least in USA) in 1988-1991-ish period and even after SNES was released it was still selling decently cause it was cheaper than Genesis and SNES. And here in Europe, I think it was more common to play on NES games on NES hardware "clones" than on real NES cause NES clones were cheaper. Some of my friends even played on the NES "clone" hardware rather than on actual NES hardware.
 

wonderfly

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I have the Wikipedia entry on Nintendo Hard bookmarked. These are the games I avoid.

Fun Fact: I have actually cleared Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles without Game Genie. It's not about split second timing, like the other Nintendo Hard games. It's about the knowing the tricks.


From that link:

"The enduring term originated with Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) games from the mid-1980s to early 1990s, such as Ghosts 'n Goblins (1986), Contra (1988), Ninja Gaiden (1988), and Battletoads (1991)."

Yep, I hated Ghosts n Goblins. Hated Battletoads. Hated the original Contra. But Ninja Gaiden? I beat Ninja Gaiden. Was it hard? Yes, but I beat that game. One of my crowning NES achievements (along with beating Mega Man 2).

A tangent about the 32-bit and 64-bit era:

On another side, it has felt that to me that right around the early of the PlayStation 1 and Saturn (broadly 1994-1998 or so, but mostly around 1997), it seems to me that there were fewer games based on kid-centric animated series (at least American ones).

Like Tiny Toons had a handful of games, Animaniacs only had a smaller handful, Pinky & The Brain had two, and shows like Freakazoid and Histeria had none.

Likewise, in the three years between Real Monsters for SNES and Genesis, and Rugrats: Search for Reptar on PS1, there were no Nickelodeon-related titles on game consoles whatsoever.

I guess the 32-bit generation targeted teens and young adults more than previous eras did, hence the more notable cartoon-based games of that period (Reboot, Speed Racer and the game based on Disney's Hercules) were ones that appealed more to those demographics.

Heck, IINM, Search for Reptar was part of a marketing push from Sony for more kid and family-oriented games on PS1.

Yeah, the Atari Jaguar (released in 1993) had for it's biggest hit "Aliens vs Predator".

I think you're on to something there. By 1994 to 1997, the kids that grew up with the NES and SNES were now entering high school (or leaving high school, like me). Maybe the video game industry thought getting more "mature" was the direction they needed to go. But then Pokemon came out, and the industry reset, and suddenly we had games like "Banjo-Kazooie" and "Spyro the Dragon". It probably goes back to the generational shift between "Gen X" and "Millennials" around this time.

It might also have to do with the transition to 3D games during those years (those early 3D games were rough. It was Mario 64 in 1996 that was the game changer).

I don't have much more to say about Nickelodeon video games, other than I did have cable in the late 90's, and I certainly remember Rugrats being huge in 1998/1999, and I do remember seeing Rugrats video games in the store by that point.
 

Leviathan

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"Nintendo Hard" wasn't a concept back then, it was all anyone knew. Most developers were practicing what they learned at the arcade, where games were supposed to be hard to drain quarters from players. For home consoles that wasn't a requirement anymore but it was just kinda "the standard" at that point.
The rental market was a huge factor in that. In the NES days, Japanese games had their difficulty tweaked to be harder when they were localized, because game companies didn't want kids to beat their games in one weekend rental.

Nintendo even sued Blockbuster at one point, that's how much game companies hate rentals.
 
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cheril59

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The rental market was a huge factor in that. In the NES days, Japanese games had their difficulty tweaked to be harder when they were localized, because game companies didn't want kids to beat their games in one weekend rental.

Nintendo even sued Blockbuster at one point, that's how much game companies hate rentals.
Don't know if that's related to game companies hating rentals, but sometime after I turned nine years old, I rented "Super Smash Bros. Melee" from Hollywood Video, and I kept it for so long, my parents got a call from the store demanding they return the game and pay late fees, so they did. I never wanted to stop playing that game though. They did buy me a copy from another store later on, maybe for my tenth birthday...?
 

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